Open access: Beall is a loon

Well, this is disappointing: Jeffrey Beall, the librarian who maintains a valuable list of predatory open access publishers (and accompanying blog), is a total lunatic. From a paper he wrote last year (appearing, of course, in an OA journal):

The open-access movement is really about anti-corporatism. OA advocates want to make collective everything and eliminate private business, except for small businesses owned by the disadvantaged. They don’t like the idea of profit, even though many have a large portfolio of mutual funds in their retirement accounts that invest in for-profit companies.

And so on. Not really much more to say about it; here are a few links with more discussion:
Wayne Bivens-Tatum
Stevan Harnad
Roy Tennant
Michael Eisen
Joseph Esposito

 

I’ve mentioned Beall once before here.  I stumbled across this particular piece of insanity while trying to make sense of a recent, incomprehensible post on Beall’s blog.  He didn’t allow my comment there, presumably because it was mildly critical and not attached to a real e-mail address; I include it here:

This post is very inside baseball. Here are a few of the questions that it raises for me as a reader: who in your audience do you expect to understand it? What does it mean for someone to be an “open-access bully”? Can it really be plausible that one of these people is “the sole champion” of green OA? Is there any meaningful connection between a request button on DSpace and OA, and if so what is it? Why should anyone care about this conversation? Is the final paragraph supposed to be a joke? (It doesn’t read like one, but I have trouble believing that it is meant in any serious way.)

Update: Ok, one or two of these questions can be answered by reading Harnard’s blog: http://openaccess.eprints.org/index.php?/archives/1112-Publisher-Open-Access-Embargoes-and-the-Copy-Request-Button.html

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